Wednesday, February 6, 2008

Smoking ways for prevention and role of marketing


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

6 comments:

Varun Reddy Sevva said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

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Varun Reddy Sevva said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

Stumble Upon ToolbarStumble Upon Toolbar
Varun Reddy Sevva said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

Stumble Upon ToolbarStumble Upon Toolbar
Varun Reddy Sevva said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

Stumble Upon ToolbarStumble Upon Toolbar
Newt Gingrich said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

Stumble Upon ToolbarStumble Upon Toolbar
Blogger said...


At on end of the burning cigarette we have consumers who know that smoking is bad for health and still keep smoking , in spite of the ban on ads in TV, and increasing prices the consumption has been going up. On the other end we have large corporate houses with huge marketing budgets willing to go after the consumer to achieve their sales growth figures....

In the last few months we have had a lot of coverage on the efforts being made to reduce the consumption of cigarettes among the youth. The initiatives include,

1. Adopting a visual representation on the covers of Beedis and cigarettes to indicate that they are injurious to health. On this issue I have written earlier, and the initiative has not been implimented, due to various reasons, including the pressure from the Beedi Lobby. The initiative makes sense looking at its utility in beedis where many consumers might be litterate to read a written warning.

2. The banning of smoking on screen. The recent plea made by Union Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss to Sharukh Khan has gone unheeded. The logic is said to be the fact that many youngsters take up to smoking influenced by watching their movie heroes smoke. Though it very easy to blame the entertainment industry for the ills of smoking and drinking , but is it the solution.

3. The latest is the survey which points to the role of family members in inducing youth into smoking. The survey points to the fact 35 per cent have one or more parent who smoke thus conditioning their mind towards a casual attitude towards smoking.

The survey also brought out that smoking prevalence amongst youths in 2000 was 4.8 per cent which catapulted upto 15.9 per cent in 2006, it points to the urgent need for prevention of smoking , because most of the people who get addicted find it very difficult to kick-off the habit.

People like Seth Godin have criticized Marlboro for glamorizing smoking and making this addictive habit a fashion statement among many younger consumers. Marketing is a very powerful tool which can be used for the good as well as bad, but the question of how can it be used to persuade consumers to stop smoking or rather not to take up to smoking is the note at which i would like to end this blog and hoping to get responses from readers, out of which i would post some of them back in the blog in the next few days....

Comments and Suggestion ..............

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