Monday, June 8, 2009

Claims in Advertisments

I have been observing the claims made in few of ads on the air these days.


The first is the ad of Safola Heart , though the brand is well promoted and the website backing up the brand is also well-designed and informative but the claim made in the ad that 36 people changed just their cooking oil to Safola heart and with nothing else changed their cholesterol levels have come down.


Next is the Lifebouy ad where they claim that a whole building which started using the soap had lesser incidences of children falling sick versus a building where lifebouy was not being used????

Something similar is being claimed by Horlicks in it's ad saying children who drink Horlicks, are taller, healthier and so and on...and to cap it they also claim that it is proven....

As a someone who has some background in research I find it very difficult to accept any of these claims being made by these well-known companies and brands, and the details of any of these claims/Experiments made by these companies are not in public domain, easiest would have been to make them available on their websites so one could check the authenticity of these claims...

I also visited the advertisement standards council of India to check out the existing norms, but could not get much of that also...

2 comments:

nitin said...

I have been observing the claims made in few of ads on the air these days.


The first is the ad of Safola Heart , though the brand is well promoted and the website backing up the brand is also well-designed and informative but the claim made in the ad that 36 people changed just their cooking oil to Safola heart and with nothing else changed their cholesterol levels have come down.


Next is the Lifebouy ad where they claim that a whole building which started using the soap had lesser incidences of children falling sick versus a building where lifebouy was not being used????

Something similar is being claimed by Horlicks in it's ad saying children who drink Horlicks, are taller, healthier and so and on...and to cap it they also claim that it is proven....

As a someone who has some background in research I find it very difficult to accept any of these claims being made by these well-known companies and brands, and the details of any of these claims/Experiments made by these companies are not in public domain, easiest would have been to make them available on their websites so one could check the authenticity of these claims...

I also visited the advertisement standards council of India to check out the existing norms, but could not get much of that also...

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Rajesh Aithal said...

I have been observing the claims made in few of ads on the air these days.


The first is the ad of Safola Heart , though the brand is well promoted and the website backing up the brand is also well-designed and informative but the claim made in the ad that 36 people changed just their cooking oil to Safola heart and with nothing else changed their cholesterol levels have come down.


Next is the Lifebouy ad where they claim that a whole building which started using the soap had lesser incidences of children falling sick versus a building where lifebouy was not being used????

Something similar is being claimed by Horlicks in it's ad saying children who drink Horlicks, are taller, healthier and so and on...and to cap it they also claim that it is proven....

As a someone who has some background in research I find it very difficult to accept any of these claims being made by these well-known companies and brands, and the details of any of these claims/Experiments made by these companies are not in public domain, easiest would have been to make them available on their websites so one could check the authenticity of these claims...

I also visited the advertisement standards council of India to check out the existing norms, but could not get much of that also...

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